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I'm currently in the process of learning C and I see (no pun intended  Tongue ) that there is C and C++. The primary project I want to contribute to is the Tor Project which is mostly in C, should I continue with that or move onto C++, something else?
If you’re interested in developing things in C why would you change to other a programming language?

Anyways C and C++ aren’t REALLY different, so you can switch over if you feel like to in the future.

Keep it up kiddo
Learn to read and write files in c, then learn about how to create, read, write to sockets
C is a good way to learn how operating systems work

Since you want to contribute to Tor, learn network programming and try writing network stuff like:
Ftp server
Http server
Forward proxy

Those re are pretty big projects, so start small:
Bots, spiders, chatbots of minimal sophistication, ping, repeater,

Small projects, progressing to big projects
The main concept is to work on stuff little at a time and consistently
(05-10-2018, 12:34 PM)lunorian Wrote: [ -> ]I'm currently in the process of learning C and I see (no pun intended  Tongue ) that there is C and C++. The primary project I want to contribute to is the Tor Project which is mostly in C, should I continue with that or move onto C++, something else?

So my two cents on this - programming languages are not all that different. For example, I spent 3 years working with PHP, but once I had achieved Intermediate+ level, it took basically days to get to an equivalent level in Python, Ruby, etc, because they are all high level languages.

Now C and C++ are low level languages, so it is a bit of a different ball game, but these two are very similar. My general rule would be "only learn C if you have to, otherwise C++". C++ is a much more advanced and more capable language (in my opinion), although C does still have its place. 

Either way, once you start to think like a programmer and understand what low level languages mean, then switching between C and C++ will be no hassle at all. They're just tools, and you'll be able to pick and choose depending on the functional requirements  (though you probably will still have a preference).

Basically I don't think it matters because learning a programming language isn't actually about learning a programming language, it's about how to think like a developer and learning how to use structured data to solve problems.