What's your favorite non-standard Linux software?
#1
Hey,

What do you guys immediately install when you get a new distro/installation of Linux and the programs you use daily and couldn't do without?

I'll start:

♦ powerline - statusline plugin for vim and other
♦ htop - top but better
♦ XssPy - Web Application XSS Scanner
♦ wine - run windows programs
♦ Hoper - Trace URL's jumps across the rel links to obtain the last URL 
Systemback (like remastersys on crack) GUI for creating system restore points and boot-able live IOS of your system.

^KnifeBoss
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#2
I'm not hugely into Linux, but whenever I install it, I'll typically install PepperFlashPlayer so that I can use flash in Chromium when I need to. I get that flash sucks, but sometimes we just have to use it...

Nothing exciting... I'm a loser, I know.
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#3
That would definitely be Openbox, Tint2 and Compton for my GUI. I prefer having those separate window managers, panel software etc rather than having it all complete done for me with a DE like kde or gnome. But as for kind of everyday software, definitely pidgin and pidgin-OTR for daily communication.
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#4
tmux and net-tools (for ifconfig)

For desktops, well I haven't had to reinstall in awhile:
gnome, clementine, synergy, nmap, and virtualbox are the big ones
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#5
  • Git - For subversioning configs and software
  • Gvm/Go - For version control of Go
  • Pip - For install Python related things
  • Bitmask - One of my choices for VPN
  • Docker - For creating, managing, and editing containers to maintain software with weird dependencies (Like steam or spotify)
  • Nmap - For obvious reasons
  • Text Editor - Usually Sublime, but I've converted to Atom

There are also a couple of security tools, but recently I don't bother installing them and just keep them on a VM since most of them are written in Ruby or some other dependency hell language and it fucks everything up.
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#6
Do you guys use Linux as an every day OS? Currently I have yet to begin doing so and was wondering if anyone had recommendations on how to start properly "ricing" a build for maximal efficiency/battery life/style (assuming either a Debian-based distro or something along the lines of Arch or Fedora)
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#7
(12-23-2016, 06:46 PM)hworth Wrote: Do you guys use Linux as an every day OS? Currently I have yet to begin doing so and was wondering if anyone had recommendations on how to start properly "ricing" a build for maximal efficiency/battery life/style (assuming either a Debian-based distro or something along the lines of Arch or Fedora)

I've been using Linux as my primary OS for over 6 years at this point and the best advice I have is to just do it. If you like Linux and think you can handle using it as a primary OS ,do it. If not dual boot or use a VM. As for "ricing"(I've never heard of that term is this a typo of pricing?) if you want more efficiency and longer battery life this would be more about your Desktop environment(DE).

There are a lot of great DEs, personally I use Gnome 3.x but if you want to go as performant as possible some great choices are LXQt or Xfce. If you want to go super performant, but restrictive, i3(i3wm.org) is a possible choice. It's harder to use but a lot of people swear by it.

My current set up is Debian Sid (Debian development cycle is so slow that Sid can almost be considered stabled compared to other distros) and Gnome 3.x
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#8
You've never heard of ricing...? :O

https://wiki.installgentoo.com/index.php...nux_ricing
https://www.reddit.com/r/unixporn/
https://sinister.ly/Thread-Tutorial-The-...inux-WM-i3
http://installgentoo.wikia.com/wiki/GNU/Linux_Ricing
https://rizonrice.github.io/resources
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#9
(12-23-2016, 06:46 PM)hworth Wrote: Do you guys use Linux as an every day OS? Currently I have yet to begin doing so and was wondering if anyone had recommendations on how to start properly "ricing" a build for maximal efficiency/battery life/style (assuming either a Debian-based distro or something along the lines of Arch or Fedora)

Yeah just do it, assuming you're currently using Winblows 7 you might as well at least make the switch when you buy a new computer.

As for ricing, I mean if that's your thing it's cool, while everything is very customizable it can be a lot of work to maintain such a setup. Day to day I want something that is easy to use and that I won't have to remember keybindings and such. Getting good in the terminal will make you 10x more productive than any possible UI tweaks.
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#10
Solid advice re: learning to navigate via the Terminal prompt for productivity
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