What academic course opens the path into the cyber
#11
Miker, you should look at the program maps for both programs, this will let you see what courses are actually included in the program. Compare the two and pick the one that sounds better suited for you.

No one here can pick your program for you. You'll have to do some more research and pick what is the best for you, and the best for how you think.
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#12
(12-28-2016, 01:16 PM)Cypher Wrote: Miker, you should look at the program maps for both programs, this will let you see what courses are actually included in the program. Compare the two and pick the one that sounds better suited for you.

No one here can pick your program for you. You'll have to do some more research and pick what is the best for you, and the best for how you think.

Yeah, a good idea,
I will do it, thank you
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#13
Make sure to study a bit of security on the side -- I don't know the school system where you live, but most schools I know of are very weak in the security side in the software or computer engineering programs.
If you take engineering, expect the first year to have nothing to do with software at all. That's my experience here.
Make sure you're driven to learn more beyond the program and you'll do fine. Relying on just the program is a recipe for being marginal.
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#14
(12-30-2016, 09:50 AM)VenAAX Wrote: Make sure to study a bit of security on the side -- I don't know the school system where you live, but most schools I know of are very weak in the security side in the software or computer engineering programs.
If you take engineering, expect the first year to have nothing to do with software at all. That's my experience here.
Make sure you're driven to learn more beyond the program and you'll do fine. Relying on just the program is a recipe for being marginal.

Thank you, I'm from israel, so I believe the engineering education isn't so bad,
And yeah, I'm aware of it, as I heard, the interesting comes the last, I also found out that engineering is always teaching some math and physics (and I heard it is in any engineering course, probably the requirements for the course to be "engineering")
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#15
(12-30-2016, 04:07 PM)miker2808 Wrote:
(12-30-2016, 09:50 AM)VenAAX Wrote: Make sure to study a bit of security on the side -- I don't know the school system where you live, but most schools I know of are very weak in the security side in the software or computer engineering programs.
If you take engineering, expect the first year to have nothing to do with software at all. That's my experience here.
Make sure you're driven to learn more beyond the program and you'll do fine. Relying on just the program is a recipe for being marginal.

Thank you, I'm from israel, so I believe the engineering education isn't so bad,
And yeah, I'm aware of it, as I heard, the interesting comes the last, I also found out that engineering is always teaching some math and physics (and I heard it is in any engineering course, probably the requirements for the course to be "engineering")

Correct. Having the math and physics background can be useful in infosec etc even still. Most people won't use it, but a few might need it, so they teach it anyways.
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