Advice on managing a server?
#1
Hello,

I am currently thinking about purchasing a dedicated server. I am a web developer but would also like to host other services such as email, file server, TS3, IRC and maybe a game server.

However, is it best for me to run virtual instances of Linux to host each separate service or keep everything on the same OS? I was thinking of using Ubuntu, CentOS or Debian.
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#2
I would say CentOS is well suited for web servers. Also, whether you run one server or multiple virtual ones would really depend on the amount of resources you have to spare. Running multiple VMs will be pretty resource intensive.
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#3
(01-11-2017, 05:16 PM)Vector Wrote: I would say CentOS is well suited for web servers. Also, whether you run one server or multiple virtual ones would really depend on the amount of resources you have to spare. Running multiple VMs will be pretty resource intensive.

I'm more interested in which is the best practice, is it better to separate different services on VMs or just run everything on one OS, is it bad practice to run multiple services on the same server you would run a web server? Yes it probably would be better to have multiple servers doing all of this, but I am only able to use one at the moment.
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#4
(01-11-2017, 04:37 PM)EhcoStar Wrote: Hello,

I am currently thinking about purchasing a dedicated server. I am a web developer but would also like to host other services such as email, file server, TS3, IRC and maybe a game server.

However, is it best for me to run virtual instances of Linux to host each separate service or keep everything on the same OS? I was thinking of using Ubuntu, CentOS or Debian.

Could we get a spec dump of the server?

As for splitting stuff up.
If you want to do something like Proxmox where you want multiple instances from your hypervisor, and unless you're going to buy a block of IPv4 Addresses. Then you're going to have some tough luck with this. Most likely trying to route all of the VMs through local private networking is a thing. But a pain in the ass if you don't know much about networking, and virtualization software in general.

Also as for Mail, and Web hosting services go. You should have those separate just in case your mail server gets flagged for Spam or gets on a blacklist for some reason.

Btw never ask for Ubuntu or Debian, because 9/10 people will say Debian. Since it's what Ubuntu is based off of, and most likely for your needs; would be a more lightweight option then something with a bunch of useless packages/add-on's like with Ubuntu etc.
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#5
Here is the spec of the server:
[Image: WuvZcGT.png]

I am able to buy more than one IPv4 per server, so if I wanted to run another service through a different IP on the same server is that something I could do? - Such as run the mail side of things on a different IP but on the same server?
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#6
To be honest you might do better just purchasing vm instead. $5/month for digital ocean and includes IP obviously. Consider if you will really utilize the dedicated server.

But assuming you do definitely use VMs (or something like docker, but this doesn't have the same security benefit), there's a happy balance between putting everything in it's own container and running it all direct on hardware.

For VMs use KVM/Qemu, I've never heard of Proxmox, it appears to be a way of managing KVMs? It looks interesting, I'm getting sick of managing mine by hand. Whatever you use create a clean base install image and make sure you take snapshots after all the major config changes.

Yeah networking could be tricky, I do all this on my LAN and only really worry about port forwarding and that's all through the router gui. I'm not sure if there's anything special that needs to be done to prove ownership of an IP, but you can assign it to a physical or dummy interface (if you only had one nic).
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#7
As for OP I can't tell you which practise is best since I only have experience with running everything on the same box :p But I agree with Beard here, it depends on your hardware specifications and such. As for which OS you should run, I recommend Debian. It is very straightforward and supported everywhere. By supported I mean almost all server tutorials and stuff you find will work with debian.

CentOS and Ubuntu is also pretty cool. But I feel like Debian is the standard for servers :p Maybe I'm a bit biased since Debian is the only thing I use.

(01-11-2017, 08:42 PM)beard Wrote: As for splitting stuff up.
If you want to do something like Proxmox where you want multiple instances from your hypervisor, and unless you're going to buy a block of IPv4 Addresses. Then you're going to have some tough luck with this. Most likely trying to route all of the VMs through local private networking is a thing. But a pain in the ass if you don't know much about networking, and virtualization software in general.

Yeah, NAT vps can be confusing to deal with it. But can't he just get an Ipv6 block? From my knowledge, getting ipv6 is way easier because of the low demand. Usually you don't need much of a justification for a pair of ipv6 addresses compared with ipv4 at most providers.

(01-11-2017, 11:24 PM)EhcoStar Wrote: Here is the spec of the server:
[Image: WuvZcGT.png]

I am able to buy more than one IPv4 per server, so if I wanted to run another service through a different IP on the same server is that something I could do? - Such as run the mail side of things on a different IP but on the same server?

Yeah you probably could, with most applications you can bind it to the specific IP address you buy. Like nginx, mysql and others. But you should look into the application configuration documentation I guess.

(01-12-2017, 04:48 AM)StickFigure Wrote: To be honest you might do better just purchasing vm instead. $5/month for digital ocean and includes IP obviously. Consider if you will really utilize the dedicated server.

Good point yeah but it depends on how many users he's having with his services. Teamspeak being voip and file servers sounds it it will need some bandwidth, I'm not sure if one would like to cram in that into 5$ DO box. Of course, one could do it but should probably have a plan for how many users and bw it requires. And a plan for what you exceed that bandwidth. But yeah otherwise I agree with you, VMs can be a pretty good option in many cases.

You can always look into other options like baremetal cloud like https://scaleway.io.

(01-12-2017, 04:48 AM)StickFigure Wrote: For VMs use KVM/Qemu, I've never heard of Proxmox, it appears to be a way of managing KVMs? It looks interesting, I'm getting sick of managing mine by hand. Whatever you use create a clean base install image and make sure you take snapshots after all the major config changes.

Yeah networking could be tricky, I do all this on my LAN and only really worry about port forwarding and that's all through the router gui. I'm not sure if there's anything special that needs to be done to prove ownership of an IP, but you can assign it to a physical or dummy interface (if you only had one nic).

Yeah KVM/Qemu is pretty cool, for production use it will probably be more effective to use vm managers like proxmox though. Also look into the other options like OpenStack, Vmware ESXI, Vmware vSphere, SolusVM and other stuff. But I agree with Beard, recommend Proxmox because it's free if you use the community edition.
Pretty neat proxmox tutorial: https://www.kiloroot.com/proxmox-kimsufi...d-proxmox/
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#8
Don't sped money that you don't have to. I have worked for companies that right out the gate put in money to get bare metal at a colo and killed their business. Start with a VPS and work your way up, you can virtually allocate more memory and cpu as you go and eventually you MIGHT need bare metal. You could honestly just have a VPS for each service and still come below the budget for a bare metal server. Also a VPS like ones from Digital Ocean are much easier to take care of. Fuck it up? Revert to a snapshot. Bare metal has no hand holding. Start with a VPS and see if you even like hosting services. Good luck, anyone can install software and badly configure it, it takes a special type of person to be a good sys admin(Coming from a shitty sys admin).
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#9
Thanks for all the advice guys, its been really helpful reading what you have all said.

(01-12-2017, 11:15 PM)Insider Wrote: Yeah, NAT vps can be confusing to deal with it. But can't he just get an Ipv6 block? From my knowledge, getting ipv6 is way easier because of the low demand. Usually you don't need much of a justification for a pair of ipv6 addresses compared with ipv4 at most providers.

Yeah the hosting service comes with one IPv4 and a subnet of IPv6 /64, so I'm guessing I could run everything from the same server, but use one of the IPv6 addresses for email?

I'm going to consider everything everyone has mentioned and have a good think about it all, but in the mean time if any of you have any decent guides/ tutorials on securing a Linux server using Debian, that would be great (Not setting it up, just guides for making a secure setup). I will do my own research but I thought I might as well ask to see if you know of any good ones to share.
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