How did you get into security?
#11
(02-09-2018, 02:40 AM)Cypher Wrote:
(02-08-2018, 10:01 PM)miker2808 Wrote: this is mostly it.. I know it is not even scratching the "cyber security" but this is pretty much why I'm in this forum.. and annoying the community with my infine questions about stuff you probably studied in highschool
PS: your stories are like 10 times better than mine..

I also want to comment on this.

I started on security forums half a decade ago That's where it all started. These communities raised me in a way, and it was members of different communities that pushed me to pursue a career in InfoSec. It was also the same communities that got me my first tech job, and the same communities that helped me attend security conferences where I found my first real security opportunity. It was also a community member that encouraged me to pursue University. Point being, my journey started on hacking forums, and it's OK if yours does too.

Don't put yourself down. We all start somewhere.

We founded GreySec to provide hackers with a community and a place to share and learn. That includes you, too... provided you follow the rules and I don't have to ban you.
This is amazing, wish one day I'll learn enough to comment valuable posts in this forum
ps: Will do my best to not break any rules
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#12
(02-08-2018, 11:21 PM)enmafia2 Wrote: Damn you were lucky! I wish I were introduced to computers at that era.
And man, don’t be negative, you fulfilled your teenager desires!

I'm really not being "negative." Seriously if I could give any advice to past me it would have been to go to sleep on time, stay in school, and take breaks from computers. I would have been much better off had I paced myself instead of spending 12+ hours a day perched in front of a Bash prompt. I missed out on a lot of stuff I really regret now and have caused damage to my wellbeing that I will most likely never recover from. But fuck it, I'm OK at computers now.

I'm not a spring chicken anymore. I am a grown adult with grown adult responsibilities, but I pissed away a large portion of my life fucking with computers instead of getting my real life game on. I dropped out of high school to hack computers. I didn't end up going to college because I couldn't afford it, and neither could my family. Even if my family could have helped out with college tuition and board, why would they based on the fact that I did so poorly already? I lost out on the discounted college program offered by my state because I had a 1.2 GPA when I finally got around to going to night school and graduating. I worked a lot of menial non-technical jobs for over a decade because most places around my area will not even humor the notion of hiring someone who doesn't have "experience" or "education." At the end of the day, I still had to pay the bills and eat.

In my experience, most places do not give a chicken fried fuck which books you've read, if you have some shitty Python scripts on your Github, or if you have exposure to a handful of modern operating systems. Generally, they want someone who they don't have to train at all and has demonstrated that they are a "team player." Apparently, the only way to demonstrate this to a lot of managers and executives is via completing a college program. You may luck out and find somewhere that will hire you without professional credentials, but why willfully hinder yourself? Passion doesn't pay the bills; money does.

I barely scraped by financially and spiritually for a long time and made life significantly harder on myself than it should have been. This was MY FAULT. I let my ego get in the way and was angry at the world because I couldn't land an IT job at all until I was in my late 20s, despite being able to technically crush the vast majority of my acquaintances who held IT jobs. The X factor that they had and I didn't was "education", industry certifications, and "experience."

Even getting a bullshit associate's degree from the community college or saving up a few hundred for a CCNA voucher and study materials would have helped me out tremendously early on, but I was on this years-long hate crusade against anyone who held a certification or a degree and talked all of the shit about places that put these types of credentials on a pedestal (basically the entire American professional world). Taking some terrible internship doing data entry and lunch runs for some latte drinking shitheel executive would have done me a world of good professionally and financially, even though I detest this type of subservient behavior.

Again, I'm not being negative. It is what it is. Life is a marathon, not a sprint. Society has a bunch of bullshit hoops that you have to jump through in order to be respected. Take breaks. Read books. Go outside. Go mingle with people. Go out on dates. Stay in school even though its stupid as fuck. Pursue non-technical hobbies. Have fun. Your future self might thank you.
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#13
(02-09-2018, 03:41 PM)k1tsune Wrote: I barely scraped by financially and spiritually for a long time and made life significantly harder on myself than it should have been. This was MY FAULT. I let my ego get in the way and was angry at the world because I couldn't land an IT job at all until I was in my late 20s, despite being able to technically crush the vast majority of my acquaintances who held IT jobs. The X factor that they had and I didn't was "education", industry certifications, and "experience."

Even getting a bullshit associate's degree from the community college or saving up a few hundred for a CCNA voucher and study materials would have helped me out tremendously early on, but I was on this years-long hate crusade against anyone who held a certification or a degree and talked all of the shit about places that put these types of credentials on a pedestal (basically the entire American professional world). Taking some terrible internship doing data entry and lunch runs for some latte drinking shitheel executive would have done me a world of good professionally and financially, even though I detest this type of subservient behavior.

Again, I'm not being negative. It is what it is. Life is a marathon, not a sprint. Society has a bunch of bullshit hoops that you have to jump through in order to be respected. Take breaks. Read books. Go outside. Go mingle with people. Go out on dates. Stay in school even though its stupid as fuck. Pursue non-technical hobbies. Have fun. Your future self might thank you.

Well yeah, I feel you. Sometimes teenagers have those kind of ideas.
The vision of asking for college and certificates is usually critisized among hackers, maybe it's because of the way of thinking I suppose.
But in reallity, when looking for a job the situation is: imagine being a recruiter, would you have to test everyone who applies?
You might be someone with a lot of knowledge, but if you don't have those certs in order to get into the interview stage, you're pretty much fucked. And that's basically why you should stay in school.

I'm sorry to hear that you caused damage to yourself, that's unfortunate. I hope you get better or that you can cope with it.

Life is tough and not full of flowers as we sometimes would like to be; but, I think we sometimes have  to be positive.
I know that it won't make any difference but I hope you are having a great day and I encourage you to try to smile a little bit more.

Cheers
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#14
(02-09-2018, 03:41 PM)k1tsune Wrote:
(02-08-2018, 11:21 PM)enmafia2 Wrote: Damn you were lucky! I wish I were introduced to computers at that era.
And man, don’t be negative, you fulfilled your teenager desires!

I'm really not being "negative." Seriously if I could give any advice to past me it would have been to go to sleep on time, stay in school, and take breaks from computers. I would have been much better off had I paced myself instead of spending 12+ hours a day perched in front of a Bash prompt. I missed out on a lot of stuff I really regret now and have caused damage to my wellbeing that I will most likely never recover from. But fuck it, I'm OK at computers now.

I'm not a spring chicken anymore. I am a grown adult with grown adult responsibilities, but I pissed away a large portion of my life fucking with computers instead of getting my real life game on. I dropped out of high school to hack computers. I didn't end up going to college because I couldn't afford it, and neither could my family. Even if my family could have helped out with college tuition and board, why would they based on the fact that I did so poorly already? I lost out on the discounted college program offered by my state because I had a 1.2 GPA when I finally got around to going to night school and graduating. I worked a lot of menial non-technical jobs for over a decade because most places around my area will not even humor the notion of hiring someone who doesn't have "experience" or "education." At the end of the day, I still had to pay the bills and eat.

In my experience, most places do not give a chicken fried fuck which books you've read, if you have some shitty Python scripts on your Github, or if you have exposure to a handful of modern operating systems. Generally, they want someone who they don't have to train at all and has demonstrated that they are a "team player." Apparently, the only way to demonstrate this to a lot of managers and executives is via completing a college program. You may luck out and find somewhere that will hire you without professional credentials, but why willfully hinder yourself? Passion doesn't pay the bills; money does.

I barely scraped by financially and spiritually for a long time and made life significantly harder on myself than it should have been. This was MY FAULT. I let my ego get in the way and was angry at the world because I couldn't land an IT job at all until I was in my late 20s, despite being able to technically crush the vast majority of my acquaintances who held IT jobs. The X factor that they had and I didn't was "education", industry certifications, and "experience."

Even getting a bullshit associate's degree from the community college or saving up a few hundred for a CCNA voucher and study materials would have helped me out tremendously early on, but I was on this years-long hate crusade against anyone who held a certification or a degree and talked all of the shit about places that put these types of credentials on a pedestal (basically the entire American professional world). Taking some terrible internship doing data entry and lunch runs for some latte drinking shitheel executive would have done me a world of good professionally and financially, even though I detest this type of subservient behavior.

Again, I'm not being negative. It is what it is. Life is a marathon, not a sprint. Society has a bunch of bullshit hoops that you have to jump through in order to be respected. Take breaks. Read books. Go outside. Go mingle with people. Go out on dates. Stay in school even though its stupid as fuck. Pursue non-technical hobbies. Have fun. Your future self might thank you.
I was kind of like you.. (but change the "reading books about computers" to "playing video games") 
until the 10th grade I used to play games.. spent most of my time on it..
I paid pretty much for it.. when I realized i'm not getting accepted into any normal high school.. and couldn't go study the subject I want.. 
I really wanted to study programming in highschool and was sure about it for years.. but sadly this subject only for those bright scientific class nerds.. and sadly I was just a gaming nerd (100 times worse and pointless) 
when I got accepted to a pretty shitty highschool, I knew I have to do my best unless I'll end like a pointless cunt no one wants when I'll attempt to apply to a university.. 
I wanted universities to send me invitations instead of reject notes.. 
Gladly I managed to do almost as good as a scientific class nerd.. saldy the highschool didn't have any scientific classes so I couldn't study medium high grade math.. and without physics.. (in israel math comes from point levels, minimum 3 goes to 5.. we had only 3.. and minimum for university is 4) 
I completed the 3 point math with 100.. but it was pointless when I realized nobody will care about 100 for 3 point math..
so I finished lately the 4 point math and this summer will do the 5point one.. 
all alone.. I can't afford a private teacher.. so internet is my place..
slady I have from times to times to decide what to study.. either practicing with coding or math.. (math is top priority...)
anyway, at least I got about 90/100 average which is great even for scientific class.. 
all I have to care about is the math and psychometric entrence exam for now.. 
wish I didn't fuck up my 9th grade.. could have been completely different now :/
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#15
(02-09-2018, 07:29 PM)miker2808 Wrote: I was kind of like you.. (but change the "reading books about computers" to "playing video games") 
until the 10th grade I used to play games.. spent most of my time on it..
I paid pretty much for it.. when I realized i'm not getting accepted into any normal high school.. and couldn't go study the subject I want.. 
I really wanted to study programming in highschool and was sure about it for years.. but sadly this subject only for those bright scientific class nerds.. and sadly I was just a gaming nerd (100 times worse and pointless) 
when I got accepted to a pretty shitty highschool, I knew I have to do my best unless I'll end like a pointless cunt no one wants when I'll attempt to apply to a university.. 
I wanted universities to send me invitations instead of reject notes.. 
Gladly I managed to do almost as good as a scientific class nerd.. saldy the highschool didn't have any scientific classes so I couldn't study medium high grade math.. and without physics.. (in israel math comes from point levels, minimum 3 goes to 5.. we had only 3.. and minimum for university is 4) 
I completed the 3 point math with 100.. but it was pointless when I realized nobody will care about 100 for 3 point math..
so I finished lately the 4 point math and this summer will do the 5point one.. 
all alone.. I can't afford a private teacher.. so internet is my place..
slady I have from times to times to decide what to study.. either practicing with coding or math.. (math is top priority...)
anyway, at least I got about 90/100 average which is great even for scientific class.. 
all I have to care about is the math and psychometric entrence exam for now.. 
wish I didn't fuck up my 9th grade.. could have been completely different now :/

At least you noticed. If  you're in 10th grade you are 16, aren't you? When you said you were from Israel you kinda confused me.
I wish you the best of luck, work hard and you will get it, don't give up!
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#16
I just always wanted to be a hacker. That's how. I sought these forums out because I really really want to become a hacker.

I have been into computers from a young age, but I need to work on my skill level in serious programming.

Wanted to be a programmer/hacker in high school, so I joined the programming team on my school's robotics team. I worked on the website.

I was using Multimedia Fusion to make games when I was in second grade through fifth grade.

Seriously though, I really think I need to refine serious IT skills to become a good hacker, which is my specific goal.
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#17
Adding to this a bit late - just joined this forum Smile

My career path into security has been a bit different. I left high school with a passion for the Arts, but with a reputation as someone who is "good with computers", but I never thought about going in to IT as a career. Instead, when I got to University, I chose English Literature and History as my majors, as these were subjects I was passionate about.

During University, I got a part-time job working as an IT Administrator. I didn't know anything IT apart from having a bit of a knack for it, but as my contract was not for a fixed amount of time per week, I was always looking for ways to increase my hours. So when my boss mentioned that we needed a new website, I said that I could do it. I went away and read a book on PHP and Wordpress development, and came back the next day to get started. Within about 2 months we had a decent website - and I started to look for more opportunities to get involvked with the IT, and ended up managing firewalls, databases, and our external software development life cycles.

Concurrently, as I got more interested in the web, I started looking into offensive security. Mostly because I would get bored. I started using Kali and experimenting with VM environments, but also dabbled in a few live tests routing my connections through ToR.

Unfortunately, during most of this time I was going through clinical depression. I was ruining relationships and slipping into bad behaviors. Eventually I blew it up at work and got let go. This sent me into further depression, and I ended up hacking their website and writing something defamatory on it.

I started getting into drugs, and because I didn't know any suppliers, I ended up setting up my own darkweb site. To make the site seem legit, I wrote an algorithm to populate the site with alias identities to create fake transactions between sellers and buyers. This made the site look used and active, in the hope that real suppliers would join and I could buy from them. Put this to one side for the moment.

In the meantime, I finished my degree and decided to start a post-graduate degree in English Literature. I was adamant that I did not want to work in IT... But I needed another job, and I got a better position at another company as IT Manager, and was basically responsible for a complete organisational architecture. This is where I ended up learning most of my IT skills.

About 2 months after starting this job I was arrested for both the website hacking and the darkweb operation (unfortunately, even creating fake offers for selling drugs is a serious offence where I live). I had shut the site down about 4 months prior when I finally beat my depression, and I never managed to find a supplier, so it was completely unused - but these fake identities meant I had committed a series of crimes (and of course, law enforcement didn't know they were fake until after I was arrested).

Luckily, my boss was very understanding and I kept working there for 18 months after narrowly avoiding any prison time.

However, what I learnt was that I now really wanted to start working in IT. It was obviously something I was meant to do.

Unfortunately, due to my convictions, I could not find a job anywhere. I would interview for a job, they would love me, and call me back for a second interview where someone would ask about my record, I would admit it, and was promptly told to get out. This happened about 30 times over 3 months as I applied for entry level IT positions throughout the country.

I was forced to expand my job search to look overseas, and by pure luck secured a position on the other side of the world as an InfoSec Analyst. I've been working here for 3 months and starting to get my industry qualifications in pen testing and other areas, and now hoping to get involved with ICS and critical national infrastructure, which although this is a high-security position, it's much more flexible than the requirements for Security Clearance.

I struggle very much to avoid hacking websites, it's like an addiction. I now have a strong level of comprehension, and it's difficult to avoid exercising that muscle. The saddest thing is I can never get a job as a pen tester as my convictions rule me out.

And so that's how I ended up working in IT security Smile
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#18
I did programming in college, then I decided to specialize and found security. I found it was incredibly fun and I've been passionate in it ever since. In order to get experience with red team, I pretty much had to target some companies. Nobody's gonna hire me or offer me an internship, bug bounties don't cover attacks on their internal network, and vulnerable boxes aren't the same. But w/e that's just how it is. Nothing I can do about that, so I do what I gotta do.

I like all forms of hacking though, but I think red team is the most fun. I like how it's a mix of all kinds of fields of hacking, like social engineering, web exploitation, network security, etc.
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#19
Apart from building my own computer when I was in middle school in order to play games, I knew almost nothing about technology.

Fast forward through all the gaming and not being really productive, I went to university and decided to go for computer engineering because a) I like computers despite not knowing much about them (association with video games I guess) b) I did not have to take biology. Just went through the motions and did average to mediocre in university. Finally, senior year I took a class where my professor taught us about buffer overflows and I was fascinated by the ability to overwrite code with your own. For homework we had 5 pieces of code where we would have to execute the unreachable function in each code by finding a vulnerability then figuring out what kind of input you would need to put in order to rewrite the code to have the unreachable function run. After that, I pretty much got the rush from solving puzzles and being able to break stuff.

After that I just lurked around forums and chats to try and learn what I can. At this point, I am trying my hardest to participate in forums and conferences to learn as much as possible. I love participating because it feels nice to learn and share knowledge with others at the same time, but I hate it because I have a big fear of being seen as an idiot/feeling like an idiot. I still feel like an idiot most of the time, but I am putting in the effort to not let that stop me from posting Smile
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