is hacktivism as a movement gone for good?
#1
So I was reading these articles that say that hacktivism is more likely to be in a "lull" than a conclusion:

https://www.securityweek.com/hacktivist-...t-2015-ibm

I'm thinking, is hacktivism probably gone for good? Or do you think it can be revived somehow?
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#2
(04-11-2020, 08:48 PM)QMark Wrote: So I was reading these articles that say that hacktivism is more likely to be in a "lull" than a conclusion:

https://www.securityweek.com/hacktivist-...t-2015-ibm

I'm thinking, is hacktivism probably gone for good? Or do you think it can be revived somehow?

Organized hacking groups still exist, so hacktivism is not "gone". Just maybe not hacking stupid things for the lulz.
Many of the people in those groups where young, people who were not sentenced to jail have grown up, got families and responsibilities.

Also, because of how the media has dealt with hacking groups like anonymous, they are totally ridiculed by the mainstream people. So the main interest (or what I can imagine the main interest was for the members) of getting recognition is totally destroyed.
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#3
(04-12-2020, 11:18 AM)enmafia2 Wrote:
(04-11-2020, 08:48 PM)QMark Wrote: So I was reading these articles that say that hacktivism is more likely to be in a "lull" than a conclusion:

https://www.securityweek.com/hacktivist-...t-2015-ibm

I'm thinking, is hacktivism probably gone for good? Or do you think it can be revived somehow?

Organized hacking groups still exist, so hacktivism is not "gone". Just maybe not hacking stupid things for the lulz.
Many of the people in those groups where young, people who were not sentenced to jail have grown up, got families and responsibilities.

Also, because of how the media has dealt with hacking groups like anonymous, they are totally ridiculed by the mainstream people. So the main interest (or what I can imagine the main interest was for the members) of getting recognition is totally destroyed.

Ok so then your saying there’s not a lot of people who are interested anymore. Like if it happened once why can’t it happen again?

A lot of experts think it’s just a “lull” in hacktivist activity and not a conclusion and that there are already signs of remewed interest.
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#4
People are still interested in the hacking movement, but the people that hacked for the "lulz" are gone now. Just like enmafia2 said they have families and responsibillities so those guys wont be hacking for lulz anymore.

And because the media destroyed the image of what hacktivism is and their affiliated groups the "new" people who are hacking today wont go public with any of their operations, attacks or projects. I think that people lost interest in the attention seeking aspect of it all. The community mostly resides "underground" and tbh i think it should stay that way.
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#5
It may also be interesting to note that some groups like GhostSec were co-opted by intelligence services. A good while ago they were involved in targeting infrastructure of terrorist organizations in the middle east.

If you're going to be doing something like that and your objectives align with those of the intelligence community you're exposing yourself to influence from the intelligence community, perhaps directly perhaps indirectly.

You'll be doing auxiliary operations for outfits such as GCHQ. If things go well, great. If anything goes bad you'll be the patsy. Just goes to show that even a group of intelligent individuals can be subverted into becoming useful idiots. If you want to do that sort of work for ideological reasons or otherwise, you should apply for a job as a contractor. Contractors get business from nation-states outsourced to them, it's the better way to go about it because at least you'll have legitimacy through the contract and protections under the law.
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#6
Things seemed to change after 2012. LE started to have some high profile success busting LulzSec and other anons then you had the NSA leaks showing just what people were up against. As The Grugq says, hackers are no longer the apex predator and have needed to go underground.
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#7
(11-10-2020, 02:00 AM)Vector Wrote: It may also be interesting to note that some groups like GhostSec were co-opted by intelligence services. A good while ago they were involved in targeting infrastructure of terrorist organizations in the middle east.



If you're going to be doing something like that and your objectives align with those of the intelligence community you're exposing yourself to influence from the intelligence community, perhaps directly perhaps indirectly.



You'll be doing auxiliary operations for outfits such as GCHQ. If things go well, great. If anything goes bad you'll be the patsy. Just goes to show that even a group of intelligent individuals can be subverted into becoming useful idiots. If you want to do that sort of work for ideological reasons or otherwise, you should apply for a job as a contractor. Contractors get business from nation-states outsourced to them, it's the better way to go about it because at least you'll have legitimacy through the contract and protections under the law.

I understand your point.

(11-04-2020, 10:01 AM)Xalium Wrote: People are still interested in the hacking movement, but the people that hacked for the "lulz" are gone now. Just like enmafia2 said they have families and responsibillities so those guys wont be hacking for lulz anymore.

And because the media destroyed the image of what hacktivism is and their affiliated groups the "new" people who are hacking today wont go public with any of their operations, attacks or projects. I think that people lost interest in the attention seeking aspect of it all. The community mostly resides "underground" and tbh i think it should stay that way.

I actually made a new thread about a potential slow return of hacktivism because I notice something going on in the news nowadays:

https://greysec.net/showthread.php?tid=7654

I think that there may be a new more diverse hacktivist movement coming.
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#8
Hacktivists can be motivated by political views, cultural/religious beliefs, national pride, or terrorist ideology. The most notable example has been from a group called Anonymous. This group of loosely affiliated hackers from around the world banded together to attack organizations they felt were in the wrong.
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