what's the difference between an Ethernet address and a MAC address?
#1
Because to me they seem like the exact same thing. They identify the device in hardware. They are the physical address.

What is the difference between a hexadecimal number that identifies an Ethernet NIC and a hexadecimal number that identifies the node on Ethernet via the Ethernet NIC?

Because they both identify the Ethernet NIC.
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#2
Literally just searched your thread title in google. This is the first result.
[Image: BbPgW05.png]

So... it's the same thing.

Please be sure to research your topics before making low quality threads like this.
Follow these guidelines: https://greysec.net/showthread.php?tid=3438
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#3
(07-17-2020, 11:39 PM)Insider Wrote: Literally just searched your thread title in google. This is the first result.
[Image: BbPgW05.png]

So... it's the same thing.

Please be sure to research your topics before making low quality threads like this.
Follow these guidelines: https://greysec.net/showthread.php?tid=3438

Then why did the book give me two separate flashcards? Lol.
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#4
(07-18-2020, 02:52 AM)QMark Wrote: Then why did the book give me two separate flashcards? Lol.

Sounds like a bad book! Either way. True or not, I feel like you have a tendency to spam a lot of thread here first. Before going out to research your topics. There's plenty of resources out in the web.

Be sure to ask questions the smart way. I don't want this forum turning into a Low quality yahoo answers forum.
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#5
although quick google search says both are same but it might also depends on context, from Wikipedia, Notes ,a   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet 


The experimental Ethernet described in the 1976 paper ran at 2.94 Mbit/s and has eight-bit destination and source address fields, so the original Ethernet addresses are not the MAC addresses they are today.[11] By software convention, the 16 bits after the destination and source address fields specify a "packet type", but, as the paper says, "different protocols use disjoint sets of packet types". Thus the original packet types could vary within each different protocol. This is in contrast to the EtherType in the IEEE Ethernet standard, which specifies the protocol being used
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#6
Ive only ever used the term mac address...

however - something to consider - not all mac addresses would be considered ethernet addresses. there are non-ethernet chips that have mac addresses as well (ie bluetooth). so that may play some distinction based on what the actual question may have been.
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#7
(07-19-2020, 04:24 AM)MuddyBucket Wrote: Ive only ever used the term mac address...

however - something to consider - not all mac addresses would be considered ethernet addresses. there are non-ethernet chips that have mac addresses as well (ie bluetooth). so that may play some distinction based on what the actual question may have been.

Then they aren't technically the same thing.

Ethernet addresses are MAC addresses of Ethernet chips would be the best answer based on what I'm reading here.
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