it looks like Hacktivism is slowly returning as a trend
#1
Here's one non-anarchist/non-anonymous example:

https://www.reddit.com/r/worldnews/comme...te_doxxes/

here's another from a couple of months ago with the same old traditional anarchist hacker group we all know and love:

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/a...ns/615058/

I think its slowly becoming a thing again.

Although it appears to getting more diverse.
Reply
#2
Interesting, we'll see how it goes. I don't really hear much about hacking groups these days. Mostly just about cybercrime groups like Emotet-botnet operators and similar actors. But maybe I'm living under a stone these days haha.
Reply
#3
Not even going to lie, would be cool to start seeing 'groups' become more of a thing.
Reply
#4
(02-05-2021, 04:12 AM)ueax Wrote: Not even going to lie, would be cool to start seeing 'groups' become more of a thing.

I agree. It was a thing a few years ago.

(02-05-2021, 03:39 AM)Insider Wrote: Interesting, we'll see how it goes. I don't really hear much about hacking groups these days. Mostly just about cybercrime groups like Emotet-botnet operators and similar actors. But maybe I'm living under a stone these days haha.

I don't know if it is but I hear about "renewed interest." I think it is slowly gonna start becoming a thing. Its just its going slowly.

I think the problem was that less skilled hackers were part of bringing the community together and enabling people to hack. The skilled people have a hard time finding other skilled people.

So I think as people become more technically savvy and as we progress into more understanding of computers, it will be easier for people that are skilled to network with other skilled people.

I think having people with lower levels of skill in the community requires a hierarchy. Hackers would have to either revert back to that (because newer hacktivists don't do that) or they would have to find another way to find each other.

But as more Universities teach people about security I think this will be a thing again. It will probably be people that are more likely to know each other in person at first.

Or it will be a thing where people get together and form groups for something and find out that one another are grey hats and they will start to see potential to ban together.

The tech community and cybersec skills just need to get to a point where it isn't as niche and then I think it will start to be a thing. Or at least, the potential will be there.
Reply
#5
Media coverage rarely reflects reality. Wifatch, Phineas Fisher, etc. Not to mention the thousands of hacks that aren't publicized. Just because you don't hear about things doesn't necessarily mean they don't happen.
Reply
#6
(02-06-2021, 03:01 AM)DeepLogic Wrote: Media coverage rarely reflects reality. Wifatch, Phineas Fisher, etc. Not to mention the thousands of hacks that aren't publicized. Just because you don't hear about things doesn't necessarily mean they don't happen.

I will look that up.

But why did they stop covering it? Is it just that it’s not a good talking point?
Reply
#7
I've NEVER understood why hackers group up and do illegal shit together.

Cops infiltrate groups. Cops capture 1 member and flip them to take down everyone else. Members have disagreements and expose/dox, or rat out each other. I've seen shit like this happen countless times over the decades I've been in the hacking scene. I would absolutely NEVER tell someone I was doing something illegal, let alone telling them specifically what I was doing. Even if I took all the opsec knowledge/tactics i have at my disposal. All it takes is that one slip up. that one moment of trusting just a little too much. And the more you interact with another person (or people), the more opportunity there is for that happen.

And then you have the fact these groups usually try to draw as much attention to themselves as much as human fuckingly possible. *If* I were to theoretically hack something, you'd never know I was there. And even if you were aware of my presence, I wouldn't have put up big fucking neon signs saying "hey, me and my friends fucked up your shit! and you can google where we hang out and shit"

It's all idiotic, if you ask me!
Reply
#8
(02-06-2021, 07:46 PM)MuddyBucket Wrote: I've NEVER understood why hackers group up and do illegal shit together.

Cops infiltrate groups. Cops capture 1 member and flip them to take down everyone else. Members have disagreements and expose/dox, or rat out each other. I've seen shit like this happen countless times over the decades I've been in the hacking scene. I would absolutely NEVER tell someone I was doing something illegal, let alone telling them specifically what I was doing. Even if I took all the opsec knowledge/tactics i have at my disposal. All it takes is that one slip up. that one moment of trusting just a little too much. And the more you interact with another person (or people), the more opportunity there is for that happen.

And then you have the fact these groups usually try to draw as much attention to themselves as much as human fuckingly possible. *If* I were to theoretically hack something, you'd never know I was there. And even if you were aware of my presence, I wouldn't have put up big fucking neon signs saying "hey, me and my friends fucked up your shit! and you can google where we hang out and shit"

It's all idiotic, if you ask me!
This is a really good point LMAO. I think other groups have done it (and some that I've seen) for power. By power I mean someone wants a reputation under some allias and make it public. Sure it only works if there is OPSEC but I also agree with you, it'd be really dumb to bring as much attention as possible to a group. It'd make more sense if a group of people banded together to collaborate to bring down an organization; but making operations public is just begging "please find me and arrest me governments, ty".
Reply
#9
(02-06-2021, 10:15 PM)ueax Wrote:
(02-06-2021, 07:46 PM)MuddyBucket Wrote: I've NEVER understood why hackers group up and do illegal shit together.

Cops infiltrate groups. Cops capture 1 member and flip them to take down everyone else. Members have disagreements and expose/dox, or rat out each other. I've seen shit like this happen countless times over the decades I've been in the hacking scene. I would absolutely NEVER tell someone I was doing something illegal, let alone telling them specifically what I was doing. Even if I took all the opsec knowledge/tactics i have at my disposal. All it takes is that one slip up. that one moment of trusting just a little too much. And the more you interact with another person (or people), the more opportunity there is for that happen.

And then you have the fact these groups usually try to draw as much attention to themselves as much as human fuckingly possible. *If* I were to theoretically hack something, you'd never know I was there. And even if you were aware of my presence, I wouldn't have put up big fucking neon signs saying "hey, me and my friends fucked up your shit! and you can google where we hang out and shit"

It's all idiotic, if you ask me!
This is a really good point LMAO. I think other groups have done it (and some that I've seen) for power. By power I mean someone wants a reputation under some allias and make it public. Sure it only works if there is OPSEC but I also agree with you, it'd be really dumb to bring as much attention as possible to a group. It'd make more sense if a group of people banded together to collaborate to bring down an organization; but making operations public is just begging "please find me and arrest me governments, ty".

Historically it's been rooted in narcissism and ego imo. They wanted to be famous/important. Though i think in more recent times money and power has also been a large component, at least with hacking groups in general. haktivism specifically usually has a politicial or social intent behind it, but that doesn't necessarily exclude other motivators mentioned.
Reply
#10
(02-07-2021, 07:02 PM)MuddyBucket Wrote:
(02-06-2021, 10:15 PM)ueax Wrote:
(02-06-2021, 07:46 PM)MuddyBucket Wrote: I've NEVER understood why hackers group up and do illegal shit together.

Cops infiltrate groups. Cops capture 1 member and flip them to take down everyone else. Members have disagreements and expose/dox, or rat out each other. I've seen shit like this happen countless times over the decades I've been in the hacking scene. I would absolutely NEVER tell someone I was doing something illegal, let alone telling them specifically what I was doing. Even if I took all the opsec knowledge/tactics i have at my disposal. All it takes is that one slip up. that one moment of trusting just a little too much. And the more you interact with another person (or people), the more opportunity there is for that happen.

And then you have the fact these groups usually try to draw as much attention to themselves as much as human fuckingly possible. *If* I were to theoretically hack something, you'd never know I was there. And even if you were aware of my presence, I wouldn't have put up big fucking neon signs saying "hey, me and my friends fucked up your shit! and you can google where we hang out and shit"

It's all idiotic, if you ask me!
This is a really good point LMAO. I think other groups have done it (and some that I've seen) for power. By power I mean someone wants a reputation under some allias and make it public. Sure it only works if there is OPSEC but I also agree with you, it'd be really dumb to bring as much attention as possible to a group. It'd make more sense if a group of people banded together to collaborate to bring down an organization; but making operations public is just begging "please find me and arrest me governments, ty".

Historically it's been rooted in narcissism and ego imo. They wanted to be famous/important. Though i think in more recent times money and power has also been a large component, at least with hacking groups in general. haktivism specifically usually has a politicial or social intent behind it, but that doesn't necessarily exclude other motivators mentioned.

That's a good point you are making. I actually agree with what you are saying.

Its just fun to read about this stuff. But I suppose this stuff should be done by individuals and not groups.

I understand your point though and I totally get it. Like, that's what happened with LulzSec is they got together and formed a group and then one member of that group forgot to log into Tor because he was a piece of shit and he got interrogated and the rest is history.

I also don't see why members of a hacker group have to give each other their real names. Why not just form an ACTUAL anonymous hacker group where everyone only knows each other by things like "member 1", "member 2" etc.
Reply


Possibly Related Threads…
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  hacktivism is back but Anonymous really isn't QMark 1 106 7 hours ago
Last Post: enmafia2
  is hacktivism as a movement gone for good? QMark 6 7,704 02-04-2021, 12:52 AM
Last Post: QMark
  I would like to dox celebrities, corporations, governments QMark 2 7,545 08-16-2018, 05:21 AM
Last Post: QMark
  why don't internal networks work like this? QMark 1 5,694 04-18-2018, 09:42 AM
Last Post: Brandonwheel